I dream of Ginkgo…

Imagine walking into a space where you are filled with the aroma of freshly baked bread, the sound of silence (or maybe some great, chill tune), smiling and kind people welcoming you, and the opportunity to feel your best in both body and spirit.

That is my dream for you at Ginkgo.

I dreamt Ginkgo up about a year ago and am slowly watching her come to fruition. I wanted a place where I could do the three things I love the most: bake bread, practice eastern medicine, and welcome community. For many years, Bread Culture was separate from my Acupuncture and Herbal Medicine practice. I would do farmer’s markets and then see patients separately throughout the week. When I got pregnant with Theo and during his first few months earth-bound, I quickly realized that I could not sustain my health, Theo’s health, nor the sanity of my family if I kept baking 50 loaves of bread in our home oven every Saturday morning and then went and sold it at the market. I would also teach off-site once or twice a month as well. In its time, it was wonderful, but I knew I had to make a change. Our bodies give us little clues, you know?

So I started asking the universe “how can I combine these two businesses that I love and spend more time with my boys at home?” And that’s when Ginkgo was born. Or I should say, the seed was planted. I want to create a space for the community to gather and break bread and other nutritious treats, but also bring Theo along and have a space for him and his toddling friends to feel comfortable.

I don’t know when we will open. My friend Andrea is on board with me. She is an Acupuncturist/Baker too. An incredibly good one. She infuses herbs into her whole grain baked goods and pastries, and does not use any refined sugars. She is an artist in the kitchen and a healing one at that. I am so happy she wants to be a part of it all.

Food is Medicine. Hippocrates was first to say this, or inspirit this belief. I try to live this way too. For so many years I struggled, not knowing why I wasn’t feeling right. Was it the gluten? Was it just that a bad digestion ran in my family? Was it stress? Or celiac or another auto-immune disease?

The list went on…

Once I began to understand that I could use food as a source for healing, everything just started opening up. I started adding different herbs to my home-cooked meals. I stopped eating any food that’s ingredient list had one-word or more that I did not understand on it. I started baking bread and experimenting with other fermented foods. I started eating a ‘plant-rich’ diet, and the little meat I did eat lived a healthy life. When I started feeling better, I wanted to start helping other people feel better too. That’s when Bread Culture started.

Ginkgo will take it a few steps further, by providing an integrative approach to food and its powerful capabilities to heal through nutritional programs, Acupuncture, herbs, and classes.

I look forward to breaking bread with you there.

Ginkgo Pic 1

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What if…?? A Kind Compliment and Something to Think About.

A wonderful patient of mine came in today and asked me a question. “What if I told you that you could eat bread everyday of your life and not gain weight or get sick?”

I just looked at her and smiled. She then added, “You can! That is your Bread, Mary! I do it every day!” First of all, it was a humbling exchange. I thanked her and definitely blushed.

 

 

 

But then I realized it was a lot more. It was a reason to get on this site and write more about why she and me and many others feel this way about fermented, sourdough bread. I mean, I’ve been eating it for years and therefore know this, but for those of us who are gluten free and haven’t touched it, that idea feels some sort of dream.

The reality is that you can eat bread again.

You can eat bread that was made with grain that was grown organically, harvested consciously, milled fresh with its entirety intact (whole grain!).

You can eat bread that was then made with loving hands, that was naturally leavenened, and given the proper time it needed to ferment.

You can eat it and feel satiated, and not feel bloated, nor foggy brained, nor have rashes, nor migraines, nor have crazy stomach pain (like I used to have).

I have written a lot about gluten in the past. And sure, that’s a big part of it ~ reducing gluten protein during the bulk fermentation is a big part of what I stand for. It makes the bread more easily digested.

But what about the bulk being the time when the phytic acid that’s naturally present in all grains transforms into lactic acid during the fermentation process, through the assistance of the lactobaccilus and other healthy bacteria in the starter? Thereby making the natural vitamins and minerals present in the whole grains shine forth, presenting an easier way for the body to digest and assimilate these vitamins and minerals, and in addition reducing the amount of gluten in the bread?

This, in turn, Giving the body vital energy via complex carbohydrates that through fermentation yield a lower glycemic index, bioavailable soluble and insoluble fiber (a welcoming digestive aid), keeping the body full and energized for hours.

MIND-BLOWN? I know, me too.

Let me add that I am not a scientist. I cannot prove the theory on this with a three-tiered study. But I can admit that I have used myself as a case study for many years and the proof is in the sourdough. Many people who have taken my Bread class or another similar one and have “gluten intolerance” or a “wheat allergy” report that they are able to digest sourdough without an inflammatory response. I should add that those with celiac or a severe allergy is another story, and I understand that.

That aside, show some respect for the grain and where it comes from — take a 3 hour class on how to learn an easy sourdough method that you can do in the comfort of your own home, and be present with each bite. It will fill you up, it will satiate you, and no it will not make you sick.

You too can eat this bread everyday! Just like my wonderful patient said! Have you found your favorite fermented spot yet? Have you found your class? I’m proud to say that I’ve been included in a recent LA Times article written by a friend of mine, Amy Halloran. And then subsequently, a few days later The NY Times wrote a great article highlighting more LA Restaurants and Bakers who are putting the “G” back in “GLUTEN,” if you know what I mean! Please check out the articles here and here. And please join me for a Bread class. I don’t think anything brings me more joy than to teach people how to bake a loaf of bread. Ahh, it’s just the best. Being of service and getting to talk ad nauseum about my favorite thing in the world!

If you get, give. If you learn, teach.”

We can always rely on Maya Angelou for jems like that one. So true, right?

Big Love!!

Mary

Happy 2016 Bread Lovers!

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Organic whole grain rye and spelt bread with a 28 hour fermentation. And a few Klamath olives for good measure. Savory, nutty, and nutritious!

Hello Fellow Bakers! And Happy (almost) New Year!!

It is this time of year that I try to take deeper breaths amidst the often chaos, and I become more aware of the importance of this. What it does accomplish — is it turns my gratitude practice inward and more solid, as the clarity of what is most important in life becomes beautifully more prominent. That is — more family, more love, more nature, more pausing. And unmistakenly now, more writing is part of this. Yes.  And thus, here I am again. Twice in one month. Somebody give me a cookie.

Or a loaf of bread. Sure it is my mission to teach people to make their own, and I’ve seen dozens and dozens of wonderful pictures, but it would be nice if perhaps one of my students happened to make an extra one week, or even dropped off a few slices one day…

Hint hint. Just kidding…Or am I? 😉 😉 😉

Perhaps it will help if I answered more questions. Afterall, I am well aware of how daunting baking bread can be in the beginning. I remember my crazy first loaves. Not the prettiest. Certainly the densest. Maybe  “brick” is the most appropriate word to describe them. But you just have to keep at it. As Yoda says, “There is no try. Only do.”

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Some bread vocabulary explained (in laymen’s or laywomen’s terms)

autolyse: the time after your initial mix of flour and water, before you mix in the wild yeast (starter) and salt. It is between 30 and 60 minutes usually, and is essential for the initial enzymatic activity of the grains.

‘air’ kneading: a phrase that Andrew Whitley (an amazing British baker who wrote Bread Matters) uses to explain the belief that sourdough bread does not need to be kneaded. Ooo, a pun! And Chad Robertson also exemplifies in his book //ws-na.amazon-adsystem.com/widgets/q?ServiceVersion=20070822&OneJS=1&Operation=GetAdHtml&MarketPlace=US&source=ac&ref=tf_til&ad_type=product_link&tracking_id=breadculture-20&marketplace=amazon&region=US&placement=0811870413&asins=0811870413&linkId=A37J2IZDYLLQPJRS&show_border=true&link_opens_in_new_window=true” target=”_blank”>Tartine Bread that dough can simply be given ‘folds’ every 30 minutes or so during the initial rise.

retard: aka ‘bulk fermentation’: this step occurs in your refrigerator. After your initial rise and shaping (after 3-4 hours), you place the dough in the fridge for a minimum of 8 hours to a max of 28. I have found that my sweet spot tends to be around 16-24 hours, but everyone’s fridge will have a slightly different temp, so find what is best for you. It is during this stage that the wild yeast interacts slowly with the enzymatic activity of the whole grain flour, water, and salt. In my opinion, this is where the bread develops the ability to be considered probiotic and more easily digested, so please don’t shorter this process. 24 hours is ideal — 8 is the minimum and over 28, your bread may be overproofed or spoiled.

proofing: the ‘final rise’ of your dough after it has spent time ‘retarding’ or ‘fermenting’ in the fridge. This is the hour or two when the dough sits on the counter, rising, getting closer to room temp, before it is placed in a Dutch oven or on a pizza stone for baking.

over-proofing: oh, if I had a nickel for every time I overproofed a loaf when I first started baking, well…Let’s just say it happens to the best of us  especially when we are just beginning to learn how to bake bread. There is a particular test that many bakers use to determine if their bread is over- or under-proofed.

  1. Poke the dough after it’s finished its bulk fermentation or retarding in the fridge. If the dough leaps back at your finger, it is likely underproofed (meaning it didn’t have enough counter time during the initial rise.
  2. Poke the dough: if it stays indented and doesn’t bounce back, it is likely overproofed. Meaning — you let it go too long on the counter initially or in the fridge. You can still try to bake it, but it probably won’t have any oven spring.
  3. Poke the dough: perfectly proofed: you poke the dough and it slowly and steadily rises back to meet your finger. Well done, baker!

I sincerely hope that these vocab terms and tips were helpful. Thank you for reading my blog this past year. If you have any questions or comments, please feel free to comment below. You know I always love hearing from you! I am greatly looking forward to seeing what Bread Culture has in store for 2016!

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This is me outside of the famous Amy’s Bread in NYC. She is a great inspiration to me and I am thrilled I was finally able to try her bread!

 

 

 

 

Organic Farming, Iowa-Style

early morning harvest

About 6 months ago my husband Kevin and I went to visit his family in the midwest. Lucky enough for me he grew up in farm country. He was born in Nebraska and spent most of his growing years in southwestern Iowa. My father-in-law bought two farms in his 70’s….something he had always dreamed to do, but wasn’t able to achieve until later in life. I really admire his spirit. One is never too old (or young, for that matter) to make their dreams come true.

A few days into the trip, we were headed to visit my mother-in-law, Ann, in Minnesota, and as we were driving past all the corn and soybean fields, I thought to myself: “there has got to be an organic grain farmer out here somewhere!” So I googled just that; and low and behold I came upon Early Morning Harvest: Iowa’s Premier Aquaponic Produce Farm and Grain Mill. I gasped, Kevin swerved a bit at the wheel, and then I immediately called them. Jeff answered the phone. “Hi there,” I said, obviously excited, “my husband and I happen to be driving through Iowa right now, on our way towards Minnesota. Where exactly are you located?”  A few explanations and directions later, we realized that we would be driving straight through Panora, IA. No such thing as coincidence!

We spent a few hours with Jeff. I asked him a lot of questions about farming. I am totally green, verrrrrrryyyyy green when it comes to this. It is only something in the last 6 months that I have grown more interested in, to be honest. Now, after spending time with Jeff and Kevin’s Dad, and other farmer’s recently, I dream of having my own organic grain farm one day…Jeff was very patient with my seemingly dozens of questions. Farmer’s tend to live in a different time zone of their own. I envy this. And then he showed us his Aquaponic green house. This is a whole post in and of itself, but let’s just say that I was amazed at the sheer possibility of marrying aquaculture (raising of fish) and hydroponics (soil-less growing of plants). Totally blew my mind!

As did their flour. I get it now. The freshly milled flour I get here in CA, still yielding utterly delicious and complex breads, well, let’s just say it doesn’t quite have the spunk that Iowa grains have.  And I am pretty sure it has to do with the water — or lack thereof. Iowa gets a lot more rain than we do and therefore, its soil is more rich in nitrogen; yielding healthier plants and grains. When I first opened a bag of the flour I purchased from Jeff that day, I had to take a step back. I couldn’t believe the smell. This was the Earth’s Flour. It smelled like rain, soil, insects, wheat, sunshine — all of the things you want your grains to smell like. All of the healthy things you want your family to eat, your kids, yourself.

I must admit, I was a little afraid at what the end result may be. I thought “Is my bread going to taste like dirt now?” I laughed at the possibility. I made a few test loaves and was amazed at the complexity of flavor. It is definitely distinct, so I mix a little rye and sprouted sonora berries in there to vary its taste and texture.

I call it Farmer’s Bread. Kevin came up with that one, of course. There is a definite history to the feel of this particular grain. It’s hard-working. You can feel the effort that was given by both the earth itself, and the farmer’s who spent many an hour growing it, sweat, exhaustion, and all. I admire that.

For more info on Jeff and Early Morning Harvest, take a look at their website. He does ship nationally, and in fact, I just order 50 pounds of his whole wheat flour for the upcoming Bread Festival at Grand Central Market this coming weekend.

Hope to see you there!

Love,

Mary

aquaponics

bread festival pic

 

It’s Like Shakespeare for the Breadmaker

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“A baker’s true skill lies in the way he or she manages fermentation.  This is the soul of bread making.”

Oh, how I read these words with such delight! Yes! Someone else feels the same way as I do.  They really get me.  What a magnificent feeling that is for a newly passionate baker.  I don’t know where I would be right now if it weren’t for my starter.  I feed it everyday, it’s like a little refrigerated pet, and it soothes my spirit to know that it is booming with nutrients and will make a pretty awesome loaf of bread everyday, if I want it to!

Any human being who writes words like that will grab my attention…Let’s just say, I am an instant fan.  It feels like Shakespeare to me. Shakespeare for the Breadmaker. And now I cannot put his book down. Whom is this person, you ask?  Well, it is no one other than Mr. Chad Robertson of Tartine bakery in San Francisco. Mmmmmm. If you haven’t been to this bakery and live within a hundred miles of the Bay Area, you are missing out. Get your tail on that BART and get some bread already! Don’t worry — if you are gluten free, they have some options for you that are super delicious too. And for those of you who don’t live closeby, his new book is a must-read for all of you out there who are uber passionate about fresh bread. His recipes are simple and thorough and his constant drive to create wholesome bread with just the four main ingredients is so refreshing and inspiring. The entire first chapter is devoted to his time in France when he was first starting out. Talk about taste nostalgia. It is a cookbook, but not in the formulaic sense. It feels more like a narrative and it helps teach you to dig into your intuition when it comes to making a better loaf of bread.  Amazing, if you ask me! I took a class a few weeks back taught by a great guy named Michael O’Malley and he told us all about Chad Robertson and how his book, Tartine Bread, is the hot new book on bread. I cannot put the thing down!

http://www.tartinebakery.com/

And speaking of the class, I must tell you about it…It was pretty much like a Sourdough Starter 101 class.  I heard about it from the wonderful folks over at Grist & Toll. I had a hunch it was going to be great. And it sure was!  Michael was thorough and charming, he was informative, he really helped me understand the importance of keeping a healthy starter and what it would do for my bread in the long-run.  Michael himself is a sculptor, who happens to also be passionate about making bread, so he build a mobile bread oven so that he could drive it to various parts of California and elsewhere in hopes to build enthusiasm for fresh bread in our community.  He refers to his oven as MOMO, or the Michael O’Malley Mobile Oven.  Pretty sweet.  You can read all about him and maybe make a loaf for yourself at one of his community days right here:

http://momalley.org/

Here’s a few tips that I learned in class that day that were spoken by Michael, but I think may have been inspired by Tartine Bread. Some of these things might be common sense for the more advanced baker, but a lot of it was news to me:

1. If you want to be a real bread maker, invest in a scale.  Cups aren’t gonna work anymore, folks.  Grams are much more consistent.  You have to start thinking more like a chemist, if you want to be a pro.

2. Feed that starter everyday, if you can.  If you miss a day, don’t be hard on yourself.  It will survive.  But nurture it, because after all it is a living thing.

3. In the words of Andrew Whitley, “real bread takes time,” but it also makes time too.  I used to say I never had the time to make my own bread, that I was too “busy.” In reality, making more bread has allotted for more things to get accomplished because I have become more patient and conscious of timing…that’s a beautiful thing.  You can do it! Trust me, there is always enough time! Try it for yourself and report back if you think I am crazytown or there is some truth in it!

4. The hotter the oven, the crispier the bread.  Seems like common sense, but wow! The MOMO oven is heated up to nearly 600 degrees, the bread is finished in under 20 minutes or so, and the crust is crispy and the inside moist.  Yum!

5. Mixers are not necessary.  Don’t be afraid to get in there and use your hands.  Less clean up, less oxidation (nutrients don’t fall away) and at the end of the day, there’s more love in it too.

6. If the starter floats in water, it’s healthy.  If it smells like acetone, trust yourself, it is acetone.  Try to revamp it, don’t give up immediately, but if it continues to have a searing smell like your sister’s nail polish remover, throw that stuff away and start fresh.

And the most important lesson in all of this, the Aesop’s Fable of sorts, well, at least for me is that it is of the upmost importance that you are doing what you love in life, folks.  Regardless of time, and money, and stress, or whatever.  Little did I know that having a sudden, crappy gluten allergy was going to lead me on a tailspin of happiness and self-discovery! I hope the same for you all, that you do what you love, no matter what it is that makes you smile!

Wild Wild Yeast

wild yeast day 4

So after all of this research, I decided that I just need to jump in and try to raise my own wild yeast.  And in the end, that really is what happens.  You birth it, nourish it, watch it grow, and then hope to God it doesn’t die.  Every morning I would gently tip toe over to it, praying it wouldn’t be pink or moldy.  I would breathe a sigh of relief and then everyday for two weeks I would feed it.  I guess luck is on my side.  Because after those fourteen days of nervous nourishment, it grew up strong and healthy.  Months later I am creating the best breads and baked goods of my life with it. It is quite resilient.

Why did I want to make my own sourdough starter?  Well, after educating myself of the seemingly hundreds of health benefits of fermenting sourdough, I discovered that if you ferment the bread long enough, that the gluten (gliadin) molecules begin to break down leaving less gluten and thus, I have a happier belly.  Fermented sourdough bread has thousands of microflora in it, making it super healthy for the gut.  It is said that these bacteria help you to properly digest and receive nutrients from all the other foods you eat. It is chock-full of B6, B12, and lactobaccilus (a healthy bacteria).

Ok, so let me give you some deets on creating your own sourdough starter.  Trust me, if I can do it, you can!! I am not a baker and I am not a mama (yet), but I still created this puppy and nurtured it to life.  You can too!!

DAY 1:  Get yourself a mason jar with a sturdy lid.  Put the following ingredients into the jar:

2 Tablespoons flour (I began with flour I brought back from France, since I knew I did not have any allergic reactions to it and then around day 7 switched to grinding my own Farro and adding it to the starter)

2 Tablespoons unsweetened pineapple juice or orange juice (I used juice that I freshly squeezed from an organic farmer’s market orange). This is to make sure your culture is on the higher acidity side.  If you use water in the beginning, it will only neutralize it, and leave it flat.

Do not stir.  Cover with lid.  Let sit out at room temperature for 24 hours. 

Day 2: Add the following to your culture:

2 T. flour

2 T. unsweetened pineapple or orange juice

Stir well and cover with lid.  Leave out at room temp for 24 hours.  You may (or may not) begin to see a few bubbles at day two. This is the yeast!

Day 3: Add the following:

2 T. flour

2 T. juice

Stir well, cover, and let sit for 24 hours at room temp.  Bubbles should start appearing by now. 

Day 4: Stir down your culture, measure out 1/4 cup and discard the rest.

To the 1/4 cup, add the following:

1/4 cup flour (feed it whatever type of flour you want at this point — white, wheat, rye, spelt, etc)

1/4 cup filtered or spring water

Your sourdough starter should be bubbling a lot by now and should also start to smell a bit yeasty. Some people say it smells like a “fine Merlot.” If you aren’t seeing any bubbles, feel free to add a 1/4 teaspoon of APPLE CIDER VINEGAR to the culture around day 5.  The acid will wake up the yeast.  I added it for a few days around day 5,6,7 and it helped bring that puppy back to life!

Day 5,6,7: Repeat Day 4

Week 2:  Repeat days 4-7.

Week 3: If your culture is still alive and well (no pink discoloration or mold), then you can begin to place it in the refrigerator. I continued to feed it every few days that third week, and now I feed it once a week or the day before knowing I will be baking something.  It is happy and healthy in there.  People say you can go months without feeding it and that it still has a pulse when you bake with it again. I have even used it as a substitute for baking soda in a muffin recipe.  Everyone LOVED it! And it is filled to the brim with nutrients, which makes me that much happier!!

If you have any questions or comments, please feel free to write!! Thanks for reading and I hope I have successfully taken the fear out of creating your very own sourdough starter! Now, get cultivating!