I dream of Ginkgo…

Imagine walking into a space where you are filled with the aroma of freshly baked bread, the sound of silence (or maybe some great, chill tune), smiling and kind people welcoming you, and the opportunity to feel your best in both body and spirit.

That is my dream for you at Ginkgo.

I dreamt Ginkgo up about a year ago and am slowly watching her come to fruition. I wanted a place where I could do the three things I love the most: bake bread, practice eastern medicine, and welcome community. For many years, Bread Culture was separate from my Acupuncture and Herbal Medicine practice. I would do farmer’s markets and then see patients separately throughout the week. When I got pregnant with Theo and during his first few months earth-bound, I quickly realized that I could not sustain my health, Theo’s health, nor the sanity of my family if I kept baking 50 loaves of bread in our home oven every Saturday morning and then went and sold it at the market. I would also teach off-site once or twice a month as well. In its time, it was wonderful, but I knew I had to make a change. Our bodies give us little clues, you know?

So I started asking the universe “how can I combine these two businesses that I love and spend more time with my boys at home?” And that’s when Ginkgo was born. Or I should say, the seed was planted. I want to create a space for the community to gather and break bread and other nutritious treats, but also bring Theo along and have a space for him and his toddling friends to feel comfortable.

I don’t know when we will open. My friend Andrea is on board with me. She is an Acupuncturist/Baker too. An incredibly good one. She infuses herbs into her whole grain baked goods and pastries, and does not use any refined sugars. She is an artist in the kitchen and a healing one at that. I am so happy she wants to be a part of it all.

Food is Medicine. Hippocrates was first to say this, or inspirit this belief. I try to live this way too. For so many years I struggled, not knowing why I wasn’t feeling right. Was it the gluten? Was it just that a bad digestion ran in my family? Was it stress? Or celiac or another auto-immune disease?

The list went on…

Once I began to understand that I could use food as a source for healing, everything just started opening up. I started adding different herbs to my home-cooked meals. I stopped eating any food that’s ingredient list had one-word or more that I did not understand on it. I started baking bread and experimenting with other fermented foods. I started eating a ‘plant-rich’ diet, and the little meat I did eat lived a healthy life. When I started feeling better, I wanted to start helping other people feel better too. That’s when Bread Culture started.

Ginkgo will take it a few steps further, by providing an integrative approach to food and its powerful capabilities to heal through nutritional programs, Acupuncture, herbs, and classes.

I look forward to breaking bread with you there.

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A Little Bit of Press!

Hi Friends, I am happy to report that Amy Halloran included my name in her most recent article in the LA Times titled “Love Good Bread? Check Out Recommended Baking Books and Bread-Making Classes from LA Bakers.” Amy is an amazing writer and whole grain activist. We connected years ago when she was writing her last book, “The New Bread Basket: How the New Crop of Grain Growers, Plant Breeders, Millers, Maltsters, Bakers, Brewers, and Local Food Activists Are Redefining Our Daily Loaf.” We ended up interviewing eachother by phone, and it was an instant connection. She included my story in one of the chapters of her book. She talked about my Acupuncture practice, and how I found solace in the fermented, whole grain bread that I baked, since it was ultimately what helped heal my digestive issues, and ultimately many other people’s from there on.

I am so grateful to Amy for continuing to boast my efforts by including me in such an incredible lineup of Bread Sages (really, LA is full of Bread Wisdom!). I have been teaching people how to bake bread now for nearly 3 years now, and I feel like I learn more about a deeper message in the grain every time I teach it. I am purely self-taught, having baked thousands of loaves in my home oven, and out of *pure* unadulterated obsession(!), I find it necessary to help my friends and neighbors do the same! It is our right to feed our families and friends wholesome, good, nutritious food.

Really, it is our birthright.

If you would like to read the article, please click here. If you want to find out more about Amy Halloran or purchase her wonderful book, click here. 

Thank You for your support, Everyone! Happy Baking!

Big Love,

Mary

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Aunt Mary: FACE YOUR FEAR!

When my niece Lily was about 5 years old, she had a favorite phrase: “Face Your Fear.” No one knew where it came from, but she would repeat it over and over again, as 5 year-olds do, and we would all just burst into laughter, hugging her and smiling. At the time no one really stopped to realize just how incredibly wise she was.

I’ve been thinking about Lily and her phrase lately. She is 17, and applying for college, both an exciting and often fear-provoking task. And I am in the midst of starting two businesses at the same time: 1. my Eastern Medicine and Acupuncture Practice, and 2. Bread Culture as an LLC and full operating bread-teaching service. We both are at the forefront of change.

I am coming clean and being totally honest with you folks — I have a lot of fear surrounding both. All the what-if’s seem to be upfront and center, blocking my view of potential greatness sometimes. Dozens of
questions come up each day, how will I… But then I remember Lily at such an innocent and adorable age, reminding us grown-ups to go for our dreams, to trust the process, and to be vulnerable and courageous in the face of fear. Talk about wisdom!

My missions are strong. They are both rooted in helping others, so I know in my heart that they will inevitably succeed, but putting all fears aside is challenging. I’ve been listening to/reading all kinds of business media stuff lately: bread-talks, entrepreneur podcasts, business documentaries, and they all seem to have one common theme: their greater mission far surpassed all obstacles and “failures” along the way. And sure, they failed. We all do. It just makes us one step closer to realizing success. They were determined like it was nobody’s business. They didn’t take no for an answer, and they surrounded themselves with people who supported them and believed in them.

I think I can…I think I can…I think I can…

My dreams for Bread Culture are huge. I am fully determined to help all of us who want better food in this country, to take matters into our own hands (literally), and start baking! I have visions of a massive bread class in Times Square. It is filled with thousands of cambro containers, dough wands, and bread scrapers. People are elbow deep in dough, and they are smiling and sharing words with their neighbors. They are mixing whole grains in that container. Whole-organic-grains that have just been milled very recently into flour. They are sharing life stories with their neighbor, and that night they will go to their homes, place the dough in their own refrigerator, and wake up the next morning to bake it — themselves. In their own oven. Then they will break it with someone they love.

We deserve the right to know where our food comes from. What the farm was sprayed with or not sprayed with. How many thousands of hours of work the farmer put in that soil, come rain or shine. How those bubbles were created in the wild yeast we used to help the dough get its proper rise. How many hours bread needs to develop. I mean, heck, we all need time to rise, no? Poke a hole in me and I’m not ready at 6am!

So I invite you all to do the same. What is it that drives you? That one thing that keeps popping back into your head when you least expect it, hounding you (in a good way). I challenge you to go out and do it. To face your fear. After all, as Nelson Mandela put it so eloquently:

“There is no passion to be found playing small — in settling for a life that is less than the one you are capable of living.”

I think Mr. Mandela and Lily would have been friends.

lily bread pic